RISK STRATIFICATION FOR PATIENTS WITH NON-ST-SEGMENT ELEVATION ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROMES IN THE EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT

RISK STRATIFICATION FOR PATIENTS WITH NON-ST-SEGMENT ELEVATION ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROMES IN THE EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT

Unstable angina (UA) and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) accounted for 1,295,000 hospital admissions in the US in 2001, almost 60% of those patients were 65 years of age or older, and 41% were women. The National Center for Health Statistics recently reported 5,637,000 US emergency department (ED) chest-pain syndrome visits, accounting for approximately 5% of total visits. Accurate diagnosis and risk stratification of the UA/NSTEMI patient is essential to identify patients at risk and to initiate appropriate treatment.

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CARDIOVASCULAR and NEUROVASCULAR EMERGENCIES: IMPLICATIONS FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE (2003)

CARDIOVASCULAR and NEUROVASCULAR EMERGENCIES: IMPLICATIONS FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE (2003)

Patients presenting to the Emergency Department (ED) with chest pain remain a major clinical challenge. In the United States alone there are over eight million annual visits for this problem, resulting in over four million admissions. Nontraumatic chest discomfort remains the primary catalyst for ED evaluation of possible acute coronary syndromes, including unstable angina, non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and ST-segment myocardial infarction. The diagnosis and treatment of congestive heart failure is also critically important to emergency physicians and other healthcare providers. The diagnosis of cerebrovascular disease is equally difficult, with up to one million patients presenting to the emergency department with stroke each year. Therefore, it is essential that emergency physicians remain on the forefront of state of the art diagnostic and treatment options involving the newest regimens for ACS, CHF, and stroke.

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